The Parkinson Study Group Resource page is produced as a source of support and information to all members and non-members.

Check here regularly for updated information on funding sources, clinical trials, PSG newsletters and more!

To download our informational brochure, click here.

Funding Resources

The Parkinson Study Group (PSG) has funding available for investigators seeking initial support for Parkinson disease research. Candidates propose a hypothesis driven, one year research plan for a retrospective datamining research project in Parkinson disease using PSG databases. Funds have been provided by the Parkinson’s Foundation to the PSG to support retrospective datamining projects. Submission Deadline: December 2, 2019
Click here to download the RFP.
Parkinson Study Group: Mentored Clinical Research Award for new investigators in patient-oriented research in Parkinson’s disease and related disorders The Mentored Clinical Research Award (MCRA) for new investigators is funded by a grant from the Parkinson’s Foundation (PF) to the Parkinson Study Group (PSG). The purpose of this grant is to support a new investigator for a 1 year project in patient oriented research in Parkinsons disease or other parkinsonian disorders under the mentorship of an experienced investigator. The goal of the Award is to provide funding for an investigator with the potential to become an independent researcher. Appropriate applicants for the MCRA are clinicians and scientists who are within 5 years of having completed formal training. The applicant must identify an appropriate mentor or mentors with extensive research experience. Either the applicant or the mentor must be a member of the PSG. Submission Deadline: January 10, 2020
Click here to download the RFP.
This program is in collaboration with The Michael J. Fox Foundation to support the identification and validation of novel biomarkers through use of the DATATOP biospecimen and clinical data resource. The DATATOP (Deprenyl And Tocopherol Antioxidative Therapy Of Parkinsonism) intervention trial, conducted by the PSG in the late 1980s, also collected serum, cerebrospinal fluid, urine and DNA from trial participants to be banked for subsequent analyses. The biologic specimens paired with the clinical data from this study are a unique resource for identifying and verifying objective markers that change with clinical features of Parkinson disease. Click here to download additional details of the DATATOP trial. Note: For projects requiring access to the DATATOP biospecimen repository, a separate proposal review and funding mechanism is now managed through NINDS at https://pdbp.ninds.nih.gov/pd-brac.

Candidates have been selected.

The PSG Visiting Mentorship Program is funded by a grant from Sunovion Pharmaceuticals. The goal of this program is to promote the continued development of newly trained movement disorders clinician-researchers into world-class investigators. This initiative focuses on the mentorship of young investigators committed to clinical research in the Parkinson arena by seasoned, established clinical investigators. While there are several courses and conference that a young investigator can participate in, there is no substitute for a personal mentor-mentee relationship, where the mentor can review the mentee’s proposed initiative(s), and meet with the mentee’s team, local set up, and provide in-person sage advice.

The NIH PROMIS Project and Parkinson’s Disease Common Data Elements

The NIH PROMIS Roadmap-initiated project has transformed the field of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) PROMIS approaches health from a domain, rather than a disease perspective, so that it is uniquely positioned to precisely measure PROs related to physical, mental and social well-being across diverse medical conditions. PROMIS has been adopted for use by numerous NIH grantees as well as the CDC and DOD. The first NIH funding phase of PROMIS began in 2004. The second phase, which began in 2009, expanded the PROMIS Network to its current configuration of 12 research sites and 3 coordinating centers. The goal has been to develop and standardize tools to efficiently measure PROs in both adult and pediatric subjects in clinical research and care, as well as large-scale, national surveys. Today, PROMIS instruments boast over 3,000 registered users, 800 active PRO research protocols, and over 6.5 million patient responses! There are even greater implications for the future as PROMIS enjoys international support. Over 40 adult and child item banks or scales are currently available while more are under development and will be released soon. Click here to download a PDF of the Instrument Library. PROMIS is the first major attempt to bring Item Response Theory (IRT) and Computer-Adaptive Testing (CAT) into biomedical research and clinical care. Both have been the research foundation in educational testing for decades. Based on rigorously conducted qualitative and quantitative studies, a domain-specific set of items is transformed into an item bank of “questions.” Although some item banks (e.g. adult physical function) contain as many as 124 items, subjects do not reply to all the questions. Rather with CAT, the computer algorithm selects subsequent items based on subjects’ initial responses. Thus, respondent burden is kept to a minimum. In addition to the CATs, there are two other PROMIS instrument types: short forms and profiles. See a CAT demo here. The PROMIS Technology Center is an online research management tool that enables creation of study-specific websites to securely capture patient data. The study-specific PRO instruments can be administered to patients through a range of mediums (e.g. paper, computer, smart phone, computer, interactive voice response) and encompass all people regardless of literacy, language, physical function or life course. For more information, email Dr. Lisa Shulman, PSG Investigator and PROMIS PI, or visit the PROMIS website.

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) recently assembled an external working group of nearly 70 international experts to develop the Parkinson’s disease Common Data Elements (CDEs). Content standards, including data dictionaries and case report forms (CRFs), have been developed to enable clinical investigators to systematically collect, analyze, and share data across the research community.

The PD CDEs are now publically available for use! To access the materials, go to http://www.commondataelements.ninds.nih.gov/, click on Standards ⇨ Parkinson’s disease ⇨ Data Standards, then click on the domain name to view the CRF modules/guidelines.

Award Announcements

Retrospective Datamining and Planning Projects

The Parkinson Study Group (PSG) has funding available for investigators seeking initial support for Parkinson’s disease research. Candidates propose a hypothesis driven, one year research plan for a retrospective data-mining research project in Parkinson’s disease using PSG databases. Funds have been provided by the Parkinson’s Foundation to the PSG to support retrospective data-mining projects.

Please note: The PSG may have funding to cover 12-month datamining or planning projects. Funds have been provided by the Parkinson’s Foundation. More details can be found on the RFP (click here to download).

AWARDED INVESTIGATORS

2019-2020
Gregory Pontone, MS, MHS and Jared Hinkle, Johns Hopkins University, were awarded $12,500 to study “Phenotypic and Prognostic Significance of Panic Disorder in PD”.

2018-2019
Peter LeWitt, MD, Henry Ford W Bloomfield Hospital, W. Bloomfield, MI was awarded $30,000 to study “Polyamine Biomarkers of PD Progression”.

2017-2018
Ruth Schneider, MD, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, was awarded $31,653 to study “Early vs Delayed Initiation of Dopaminergic Treatment in PD”.

2015-2016
Anne-Marie Wills, MD, MPH, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA was awarded $22,950 to study “Body Mass Index and PD Survival”.

Click on any red project title to download the abstract.

October 2014
Rachel Biemiller, MD, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY was awarded $25,000 to study “PD phenotype and response to dopaminergic therapy: a secondary analysis of the CALM-PD trial”.

December 2013
Connie Marras, MD, PhD and Genetics/Environmental Risk Working Group was awarded $11,000 to study “The PSG PD Risk Factor Data Inventory: Developing a resource to facilitate data-mining studies”.

Ivan Bodis Wollner, MD, DSc, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Director, Parkinson Disease Clinic, Kings County Hospital Center and Attending Neurologist, SUNY Health Science Center at Brooklyn, New York, was awarded $14,000 to study “The relationship between levodopa therapy and inner retinal layer thickness by OCT in patients with PD”.

December 2012
Elizabeth L. Stegemoller, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, Neurobiomechanics Laboratory, Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, Gainesville, Florida was awarded a $24,995.18 grant supported by the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for her planning project entitled “Effects of Singing on Speech and Swallowing in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease”.

February 2012 Ivan Bodis-Wollner, MD, DSc, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Director, Parkinson Disease Clinic, Kings County Hospital Center and Attending Neurologist, State University of New York – Health Science Center at Brooklyn, New York, was awarded a $9,930 grant supported by the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for his planning project entitled “Synucleinopathy of the retina in Parkinson disease”.

Click on any red project title to download the abstract.

October 2011
Peter LeWitt, MD, Wayne State University, Director, Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Program, Michigan, was awarded a $12,559 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for his datamining project entitled “COMT met genotype polymorphism and cognitive performance in PD with and without selegiline treatment”.

September 2010
Matthew Menza, MD, Professor, Psychiatry & Neurology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Jersey, was awarded a $9,200 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for his datamining project entitled “An Exploration of the Association of Inflammatory Cytokines and the Non-Motor Symptoms of PD in Patients in DATATOP”.

February 2010
Un Jung Kang, MD, Professor of Neurology, University of Chicago Medical Center, was awarded a $7,600 grant from the PSG and Parkison’s Disease Foundation for his datamining project entitled “The role of motor learning in dopaminergic therapy of PD”.

October 2009
Xuemei Huang, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Neurology, Penn State Hershey Medical Center, was awarded a $13,200 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for her datamining project entitled “Serum cholesterol level as a predictor of progression in PD”. Dr. Huang will be working with Honglei Chen of NIEHS and co-investigator’s Alberto Ascherio of Harvard School of Public Health and Michael Schwarzschild or Harvard Medical School.

February 2009
Timothy J. Collier, PhD, Professor of Neurology, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, was awarded a $25,000 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for his datamining project entitled “Antidepressant Induced Delay of Motor Symptoms in PD (AIDS-PD)”. The co-investigator, Katrina Paumier, BS, is a PhD candidate under Dr. Collier’s direction. This project will be coordinated with the PSG Genetics and Environmental Working Group funded project on “Impact of commonly-prescribed medications on PD progression” led by Andrew Siderowf, MD, MSCE.

Click on any red project title to download the abstract.

October 2008
Robert A. Hauser, MD, Professor of Neurology, Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at the University of South Florida, was awarded a $25,000 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for his datamining project entitled “Determination of Minimally Clinically Important Change in Early and Advanced Parkinson’s Disease”. Peggy Auinger, MS is co-PI on the project.

May 2008
Marian Evatt, MD, MS, Assistant Professor of Neurology at Emory University and Assistant Director of the Movement Disorders Program at Wesley Woods Hospital, Atlanta, GA, was awarded a $25,000 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for her datamining project entitled “Vitamin D Insufficiency: Prevalence and Clinical Correlates in the DATATOP Cohort”. Vin Tangpricha, MD, PhD and Mahlon R. Delong, MD serve as co-PIs on the project.

October 2007
Ergun Uc, MD, Associate Professor of Neurology at Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, was awarded a $25,000 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for his datamining project entitled “Weight loss in Parkinson’s disease”. This was a collective effort of the PSG Other Non-Motor Features of PD Working Group with Carlos Singer, MD, Jay Rao, MD, and David Oakes, PhD as co-investigators.

Connie Marras, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor at Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto Movement Disorders Centre, was awarded a $25,000 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for her planning project entitled “Environmental exposures modifying clinical expression of LRRK2-associated Parkinson’s disease”. Caroline Tanner, MD, PhD and Anthony Lang, MD serve as co-PIs on the project.

July 2007
Jing Zhang, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Pathology, Shaw Endowed Professorship in Neuropathology Division of Neuropathology Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, was awarded a $25,000 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for his datamining research proposal entitled “Using human cerebrospinal fluid samples collected in DATATOP study for biomarker discovery in patients with Parkinson’s disease”. This was a collective effort of the PSG Biomarkers Working Group. Un Jung Kang, MD will be an active participant and advisor on this project. Michael McDermott, PhD will provide statistical support.

June 2007
Michael Schwarzschild, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Neurology, at Harvard Medical School, MassGeneral Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease, Massachusetts General Hospital has been awarded a $25,000 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for his datamining project entitled “Predicting PD Progression Subtypes by CSF Urate Pathways”. Alberto Ascherio, MD, PhD serves as co-PI on the project.

February 2007
Ergun Uc, MD, Assistant Professor of Neurology, of the Divisions of Movement Disorders & Neuroergonomics, Department of Neurology, University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinic, was awarded a $25,000 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for his datamining project entitled “Predictors and Course of Cognitive Decline and Depression Early in the Course of PD based on the DATATOP Cohort”.This was a collective effort of the PSG Cognitive/Psychiatric Working Group with John Growdon, Kelvin Chou, Karen Marder, Irene Litvan, Michel Panisset, Steve Anderson, and Peter Como all as co-investigators. Michael McDermott, PhD is the statistical co-PI.

Mentored Clinical Research Award

The PSG MCRA is for new investigators in patient-oriented research in Parkinson’s disease and related disorders.

The Mentored Clinical Research Award (MCRA) for new investigators is funded by a grant from the Parkinson’s Foundation (PF) to the Parkinson Study Group (PSG). The PF collaborates with the PSG to encourage the professional and scientific development of young investigators on their path to independence. To this end, this grant supports a new investigator for a one year project in patient oriented research in Parkinson disease (PD) or other parkinsonian disorders. The new investigator works under the mentorship of an experienced investigator. Training should enhance the junior clinical research skills. The research plan should address unmet needs of people living with PD, have the potential for broad application among the PD community, and lead to advances in clinically relevant treatment options. 

Award Timeline: Closed for 2020.

Click on any red project title to download the abstract.

2020
Lan Luo, M.D., M.S., Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School, Department of Neurology. Dr. Luo will evaluate “Understanding Neural Networks of Freezing of Gait.”

2019
Ali G. Hamedani, M.D., M.H.S., Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Hamedani will evaluate “Visual symptoms and quality of life in Parkinson’s disease.”

Delaram Safarpour, M.D., M.S.C.E., Assistant professor of Neurology, OHSU Parkinson Center & Movement Disorders Program. Dr. Safarpour will evaluate “Comparison of GI transit time in levodopa-responders and non-responders in patients with Parkinson’s disease.”

2018
Emily J. Hill, MD, fellow in the Parkinson’s Disease Center and Movement Disorders Program at the Baylor College of Medicine: “Genetic dissection of clinical heterogeneity in Parkinson disease.” Dr. Hill will evaluate clinic-based, quantitative mobility measures using a wearable sensor in comparison with standard clinic assessment for characteriza.

2017
Matthew N. Petrucci, PhD, Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Neurology at the University of Minnesota: “Automated closed-looped algorithm to rapidly optimize deep brain stimulation settings for people with PD.” Dr. Petrucci will evaluate an automated closed-looped algorithm to rapidly optimize deep brain stimulation settings for people with PD.

2016
Baijayanta Maiti, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Neurology, Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri: “Cerebellar morphologic and functional MRI measures as a biomarker of cognitive impairment in PD.” Dr. Maiti will explore the pathophysiologic role of cerebellum in cognitive impairment in PD utilizing resting state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) measures and their behavioral correlates. The preliminary data generated from this study served as the basis of a successful AAN CRTF award application to investigate the role of cerebellar vermis in gait and cognitive impairments in PD. The future goal is to utilize multimodal imaging techniques including PET and rs-fcMRI to study the pathophysiologic role of cerebellum in PD as an extension of the ongoing study.

2015
Tiago Mestre, MD, MSc, Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Centre, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: “Comparative evaluation of data-driven PD subtypes for clinical research”.

2014
Robert White, MD, PhD, Clinical Instructor, Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco: “A functional MRI study of dopamine’s effects on the stability and flexibility of working memory in Parkinson disease”.

Utilizing DATATOP Biospecimens

PSG DATATOP biospecimens research: Projects requiring access to the DATATOP biospecimen repository a separate proposal review and funding mechanism has been developed in collaboration with The Michael J. Fox Foundation (MJFF) and the NINDS Parkinson’s Disease Biomarkers Program (PDBP) and supports the identification and validation of novel biomarkers through use of DATATOP biospecimens.

Click on any red project title to download the abstract.

June 2015
Anne-Marie Wills, MD, MPH, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA was awarded $22,950 to study “Body Mass Index and PD Survival”.

October 2014
Rachel Biemiller, MD, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY was awarded $25,000 to study “PD phenotype and response to dopaminergic therapy: a secondary analysis of the CALM-PD trial”.

December 2013
Connie Marras, MD, PhD and Genetics/Environmental Risk Working Group was awarded $11,000 to study “The PSG PD Risk Factor Data Inventory: Developing a resource to facilitate data-mining studies”.

Ivan Bodis Wollner, MD, DSc, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Director, Parkinson Disease Clinic, Kings County Hospital Center and Attending Neurologist, SUNY Health Science Center at Brooklyn, New York, was awarded $14,000 to study “The relationship between levodopa therapy and inner retinal layer thickness by OCT in patients with PD”.

December 2012
Elizabeth L. Stegemoller, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, Neurobiomechanics Laboratory, Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, Gainesville, Florida was awarded a $24,995.18 grant supported by the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for her planning project entitled “Effects of Singing on Speech and Swallowing in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease”.

February 2012
Ivan Bodis-Wollner, MD, DSc, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Director, Parkinson Disease Clinic, Kings County Hospital Center and Attending Neurologist, State University of New York – Health Science Center at Brooklyn, New York, was awarded a $9,930 grant supported by the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for his planning project entitled “Synucleinopathy of the retina in Parkinson disease”.

Click on any red project title to download the abstract.

October 2011
Peter LeWitt, MD, Wayne State University, Director, Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Program, Michigan, was awarded a $12,559 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for his datamining project entitled “COMT met genotype polymorphism and cognitive performance in PD with and without selegiline treatment”.

September 2010
Matthew Menza, MD, Professor, Psychiatry & Neurology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Jersey, was awarded a $9,200 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for his datamining project entitled “An Exploration of the Association of Inflammatory Cytokines and the Non-Motor Symptoms of PD in Patients in DATATOP”.

February 2010
Un Jung Kang, MD, Professor of Neurology, University of Chicago Medical Center, was awarded a $7,600 grant from the PSG and Parkison’s Disease Foundation for his datamining project entitled “The role of motor learning in dopaminergic therapy of PD”.

October 2009
Xuemei Huang, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Neurology, Penn State Hershey Medical Center, was awarded a $13,200 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for her datamining project entitled “Serum cholesterol level as a predictor of progression in PD”. Dr. Huang will be working with Honglei Chen of NIEHS and co-investigator’s Alberto Ascherio of Harvard School of Public Health and Michael Schwarzschild or Harvard Medical School.

February 2009
Timothy J. Collier, PhD, Professor of Neurology, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, was awarded a $25,000 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for his datamining project entitled “Antidepressant Induced Delay of Motor Symptoms in PD (AIDS-PD)”. The co-investigator, Katrina Paumier, BS, is a PhD candidate under Dr. Collier’s direction. This project will be coordinated with the PSG Genetics and Environmental Working Group funded project on “Impact of commonly-prescribed medications on PD progression” led by Andrew Siderowf, MD, MSCE.

Click on any red project title to download the abstract.

October 2008
Robert A. Hauser, MD, Professor of Neurology, Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at the University of South Florida, was awarded a $25,000 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for his datamining project entitled “Determination of Minimally Clinically Important Change in Early and Advanced Parkinson’s Disease”. Peggy Auinger, MS is co-PI on the project.

May 2008
Marian Evatt, MD, MS, Assistant Professor of Neurology at Emory University and Assistant Director of the Movement Disorders Program at Wesley Woods Hospital, Atlanta, GA, was awarded a $25,000 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for her datamining project entitled “Vitamin D Insufficiency: Prevalence and Clinical Correlates in the DATATOP Cohort”. Vin Tangpricha, MD, PhD and Mahlon R. Delong, MD serve as co-PIs on the project.

October 2007
Ergun Uc, MD, Associate Professor of Neurology at Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, was awarded a $25,000 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for his datamining project entitled “Weight loss in Parkinson’s disease”. This was a collective effort of the PSG Other Non-Motor Features of PD Working Group with Carlos Singer, MD, Jay Rao, MD, and David Oakes, PhD as co-investigators.

Connie Marras, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor at Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto Movement Disorders Centre, was awarded a $25,000 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for her planning project entitled “Environmental exposures modifying clinical expression of LRRK2-associated Parkinson’s disease”. Caroline Tanner, MD, PhD and Anthony Lang, MD serve as co-PIs on the project.

July 2007
Jing Zhang, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Pathology, Shaw Endowed Professorship in Neuropathology Division of Neuropathology Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, was awarded a $25,000 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for his datamining research proposal entitled “Using human cerebrospinal fluid samples collected in DATATOP study for biomarker discovery in patients with Parkinson’s disease”. This was a collective effort of the PSG Biomarkers Working Group. Un Jung Kang, MD will be an active participant and advisor on this project. Michael McDermott, PhD will provide statistical support.

June 2007
Michael Schwarzschild, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Neurology, at Harvard Medical School, MassGeneral Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease, Massachusetts General Hospital has been awarded a $25,000 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for his datamining project entitled “Predicting PD Progression Subtypes by CSF Urate Pathways”. Alberto Ascherio, MD, PhD serves as co-PI on the project.

February 2007
Ergun Uc, MD, Assistant Professor of Neurology, of the Divisions of Movement Disorders & Neuroergonomics, Department of Neurology, University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinic, was awarded a $25,000 grant from the PSG and Parkinson’s Disease Foundation for his datamining project entitled “Predictors and Course of Cognitive Decline and Depression Early in the Course of PD based on the DATATOP Cohort”. This was a collective effort of the PSG Cognitive/Psychiatric Working Group with John Growdon, Kelvin Chou, Karen Marder, Irene Litvan, Michel Panisset, Steve Anderson, and Peter Como all as co-investigators. Michael McDermott, PhD is the statistical co-PI.

Visiting Mentorship Program

The PSG Visiting Mentorship Program is funded by a grant from Sunovion Pharmaceuticals. The goal of this program is to promote the continued development of newly trained movement disorders clinician-researchers into world-class investigators. This initiative focuses on the mentorship of young investigators committed to clinical research in the Parkinson arena by seasoned, established clinical investigators. While there are several courses and conference that a young investigator can participate in, there is no substitute for a personal mentor-mentee relationship, where the mentor can review the mentee’s proposed initiative(s), and meet with the mentee’s team, local set up, and provide in-person sage advice.

2019

Adam Margolius, MD with Visiting Mentor: Janis Miyasaki, MD
Project Title: “Palliative Care Program for Patients with Advanced PD”, Cleveland Clinic, OH

Drew Kern, MS, MD with Visiting Mentor: Alfonso Fasano, MD, PhD
Project Title: “Palliative Care Program for Patients with Advanced PD”, Cleveland Clinic, OH

Danielle Larson, MD with Visiting Mentor: Allison Willis, MD
Project Title: “Research participation barriers amongst underrepresented PD individuals”, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

Deepak Gupta, MD with Visiting Mentor: Satya S. Sahoo, PhD
Project Title: “Development of an ontology-based integrated database and analysis platform for Parkinson’s disease and related disorders (Insight-PD)”, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT.

New Study Proposal Toolkit

The identification of new research initiatives, the creation of innovative and unique research projects and the nurturing of new investigators and coordinators are the cornerstones of the Parkinson Study Group’s collaborative efforts and are essential to our goal of advancing knowledge.

The Scientific Review Committee (SRC) will review all research proposals coming to the PSG. The Mentoring Committee (MC) reviews proposals submitted for the Mentored Clinical Research Award program.

The PSG encourages projects which include retrospective analyses of PSG clinical trial databases. We have compiled a list of all the PSG databases that are available. Please see the PSG Database Inventory and the PSG Data Sharing Resources for more information. More specific study-related information can be found in two inventories of assessments: A list of measures included in each study can be found in the Database Inventory Assessments Spreadsheet, and more detailed information about variable coding and frequency of collection can be found in the Variable Collection and Coding Inventory.

Proposing investigators should review prior PSG studies to see if their question has already been addressed and explain why their project should go forward if it appears similar to another. Click to download PSG Proposals Approved/Awarded for detailed information.

The documents below establish the procedures and assist with the planning for new study proposals to be evaluated, reviewed and considered for approval as formal Parkinson Study Group projects. The same documents are to be used when applying for the Mentored Clinical Research Award.

Click on the links to download any of the following:

Procedures for Submission and Review of New Study Proposals (9 pages)

Example of a new proposal (doc)

Template of a new proposal (doc)

PSG Rationale, Review Criteria, Scoring System and Procedure for Rating and Selection of Research Proposals (4 pages)

Outline for Review of Proposals Submitted to the PSG (1 page)

Attachment 1 – Application Face Page (2 pages)

Attachment 2 – Example of Protocol Template

Template of Protocol Synopsis and Schedule of Activities (doc)

Attachment 3 – Checklist (1 page)

To review examples of projects that retrospectively analyzed PSG clinical trial databases, please see the following publications:

Below are two examples of successful mentored research award proposals. Click on a link to download the file.

For questions about the PSG New Study Proposal Toolkit, or for problems accessing the PDF files or hyperlinks, please email Sarah Sperling.

Featured link: Parkinson’s Foundation Patient Engagement.
The Parkinson’s Foundation can match you with trained Research Advocates and recommend how they can help in all research studies — from preclinical to phase IV studies and in observational and non-pharmacological interventional trials.

If you are interested in working with a Parkinson’s Foundation Research Advocate, please contact Karlin Schroeder, Senior Director, Community Engagement at kschroeder@parkinson.org or our Helpline at 1-800-4PD-INFO (473-4636). We can discuss projects you have in mind, as well as suggest ways to collaborate with Research Advocates to improve your studies and speed the research process.

Coordinator's Corner

Mentoring Coordinators

Karen Williams (Northwestern) and Christine Hunter presented a module they developed entitled “Fundamentals of Clinical Research” to PSG coordinators at the September 2015 annual meeting in Sanibel, Florida. A checklist was also given to provide basic “training” in clinical research for PSG coordinators which can be used by many coordinators and/or investigators as a basic tool.

Download PPT presentation: Fundamentals of Clinical Research

Download: Coordinator Training Checklist (version date 8.2015)

Karen Williams from Northwestern University presented on recruitment and figuring out why people stay away from participating in research. Though the number of studies is on the low side she still is concerned as to why people are not participating at the level they did on the past. She developed a questionnaire that people in her waiting room completed in order to learn “why” they don’t participate. This brief questionnaire, “Have you ever participated in a clinical trial” is attached to this report for your review. (Click here to download a PDF of the questionaire.)

Julia Spears from the University of Toledo presented on “Who’s Who on the 1572”. Her presentation focused on what the FDA guidelines state vs what the sponsors ask us for, even though what they request are not mentioned in the guidelines. Julia recommends setting up an SOP for the completion of the 1572. (Click here to download a PDF of the slideshow.)

Claire Meunier from The Michael J. Fox Foundation (MJFF) presented on “PSG Recruitment and Retention”. Claire has consulted with several PSG coordinators in her daily interactions with people doing research to see what is needed to get people involved in PD research. Along with determining with your PI what is your site specific process, Claire spoke of the MJFF Fox Trial Finder (FTF). Many coordinators are aware of this resource, like ClinicalTrials.gov BUT the FTF is more interactive and allows for people who register with the site to be sought out for study compatibility and for anyone doing PD research to register their study to see who might fit their criteria. (Click here to download a PDF of the MJFF presentation.)

Job Postings

To PSG members:  If you would like to post a job opportunity here, please email your advertisement to Donna Moszkowicz.

FACULTY POSITION RECRUITMENT

Joint position at the Parkinson’s Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center (PADRECC) at the San Francisco VA Medical Center (SFVAMC) and University of California, San Francisco (UCSF)
The Division of Movement Disorders and Neuromodulation in the Department of Neurology is recruiting a faculty member for appointment to the Assistant, Associate, or full Professor ranks of the Adjunct, HS Clinical, Clinical X, or In Residence faculty series

FACULTY POSITION RECRUITMENT

The Department of Neurology at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in Richmond, Virginia is seeking a full-time faculty member to join our expanding clinical and research enterprises in the Division of Movement Disorders

Expertise in deep brain stimulation and other advanced treatments is desired. An independently funded research program is helpful, but not required. This position will provide patient care, engage in medical student and neurology resident and fellow education, and participate in clinical research. Primary clinical responsibilities include care of patients in both inpatient and outpatient settings with an emphasis on movement disorders and deep brain stimulation. Applicants must be BC/BE in Neurology, have completed an accredited Movement Disorders Fellowship, and demonstrate experience working in and fostering a diverse faculty, staff, and student environment or have a commitment to do so as a faculty member at VCU. For more information, contact Dr. Brian Berman, Chair of the Division of Movement Disorders (brian.berman@vcuhealth.org).

FACULTY POSITION RECRUITMENT

Professor (Open Rank) – Movement Disorders – University of Colorado | Anschutz Medical Campus
The Department of Neurology at the University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus is seeking to recruit a dynamic leader (Associate Professor or Professor) to serve as Associate Section Chief/Section Chief to expand its clinical and research programs within our Movement Disorders section.

Other Useful Links

For more information on Parkinson’s Disease, please visit these related sites: