The PSG 32nd Annual Meeting

34th Annual Symposium

June 2-5, 2022

Phoenix, AZ

Featured Programs

PSG Junior Investigator Workshop

Thursday, June 2nd, 2:00pm – 6:00pm

The goal of this workshop is to familiarize junior investigators with a variety of new tools and approaches in clinical research by drawing on the varied expertise of senior PSG investigators. This year’s program includes featured talks on becoming involved in the PSG, sources of funding for research, clinical trial design, and conducting research in the current climate.

*The participants in this program were pre-selected by the PSG Mentoring Committee, through our NINDS Junior Investigator Travel Grant. Registration is required for participation, along with completion of the pre-course requirements that were sent prior to the meeting.

Workshop Featured Speakers

Jamie Adams, MD

University of Rochester

Dr. Adams graduated from Princeton University in 2006 and received her MD from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry in 2011. She remained at the University of Rochester for her internship in medicine before going to the University of Pennsylvania, where she completed a residency in neurology in 2015. She returned to the University of Rochester for a movement disorders fellowship from 2015-2016. She joined the faculty in 2016 and specializes in the care of patients with movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. Her research focuses on the use of technology, such as wearable sensors, smartphone applications, and telemedicine, in individuals with neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson disease and Huntington disease.

James Beck, PhD

New York University School of Medicine

As Chief Scientific Officer, James Beck, PhD, sets the strategic direction for the Parkinson’s Foundation research vision. Dr. Beck oversees a portfolio which has guided more than $400 million in research to explore what causes Parkinson’s disease (PD) and how to improve treatments, working towards a world without Parkinson’s disease. He has played an integral role in positioning the organization as a world’s leader in accelerating Parkinson’s research.

Dr. Beck has been published in many leading journals including npj Parkinson’s Disease, Movement Disorders, Journal of Parkinson’s Disease, Annals of Clinical & Translational Neurology and more. He is currently an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Neuroscience and Physiology at the New York University School of Medicine. He holds a BS from Duke University and a PhD from the University of Washington, Seattle. 

Daniel Corcos, PhD

Northwestern University

Daniel Corcos obtained his PhD in 1982 in Motor Control from the University of Oregon. He did a Post-Doctoral Fellowship in the Department of Neurosurgery at Rush Medical Center from 1983-1987. Dr. Corcos was an Assistant Professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago from 1987-1993, was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor with tenure in l993, and to Full Professor in 1997. He is currently a tenured Full Professor at Northwestern University. He has published more than 200 peer reviewed research articles and his research has been cited more than 13,000 times. He has an H index of 66. He has been continuously funded by NIH since 1986. He has been the recipient of both a First Independent Research Support and Transition (FIRST) award and a Research Career Development Award (RCDA) as well as 9 R01 grants and 2 U01 grants. He has been awarded more than $40,000,000 in grant funding. He was selected for membership in the National Academy of Kinesiology in 2001 and was made an Honorary Member of the American Physical Therapy Association in 2018. He has served on NIH study sections since 1994 and was the Chair of the Musculoskeletal and Rehabilitation Sciences Study Section at NIH from 2003 to 2006 and was chair the Musculoskeletal Function and Speech Rehabilitation study section from 2011 to 2013. He was an Editor of the Journal of Motor Behavior from 1996 to 2014. He is currently on the Editorial Board of both the Journal of Neuro-engineering and also the Journal of Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair. 

Ali Hamedani, MD, MHS

University of Pennsylvania

Ali Hamedani, MD MHS, is an assistant professor of neurology at the University of Pennsylvania. A neurologist, epidemiologist and health services researcher, Dr. Hamedani’s work focuses on the effects of visual dysfunction and other non-motor symptoms on health outcomes in Parkinson disease using population-based surveys and analysis of administrative claims. Dr. Hamedani obtained his undergraduate degree from Yale University and a medical degree from the University of Maryland School of Medicine. He also holds a master’s degree in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. Hamedani completed his neurology residency followed by fellowship training in both movement disorders and neuro-ophthalmology at the University of Pennsylvania.

Codrin Lungu, MD

Chief of the NIH Parkinson clinic

Dr. Codrin Lungu is a Program Director in the Division of Clinical Research. He has a background and expertise in Movement Disorders, with particular interests in Parkinson disease, dystonia, deep brain stimulation therapy and neurotoxins. Most recently, Dr. Lungu has been the Chief of the NIH Parkinson clinic, which he has led for over 5 years. He has also established, in collaboration with the Surgical Neurology Branch, the first NIH Deep Brain Stimulation program, and has led the NIH Botulinum Toxin clinic for 8 years. His experience includes research in imaging biomarkers, neuromodulation, and early clinical trials of novel therapeutic agents. He has been co-directing the NIH Movement Disorders fellowship and remains involved in education and promotion of research.
Dr. Lungu earned his MD in Romania; performed neuroscience research at the University of Rochester; completed his Neurology Residency in the North Shore –LIJ campus of Albert Einstein College of Medicine; and completed fellowships in Movement Disorders at Harvard Medical School (Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) and NIH (Human Motor Control Section).
His current interests include research and trials in movement disorders, including Parkinson's disease, dystonia, tremor, myoclonus; clinical applications of neuromodulation, particularly deep brain stimulation; clinical applications of therapeutic neurotoxins; studies of novel therapies in neurodegenerative disorders, movement disorders and other neurologic conditions.

Martha Nance, MD

Health Partners, Park Nicollet

Martha Nance is a board-certified neurologist and clinical geneticist with special interest in movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias, as well as other neurogenetic disorders. She has served as the medical director of the Struthers Parkinson’s Center since 2000. In addition to the care of patients and families with neurologic diseases, she is also involved in clinical research to develop better treatments for Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease. Martha is interested in education for both patients and medical professionals. She currently serves as a clinical professor of neurology at the University of Minnesota.

Joohi Jimenez Shahed, MD

Mount Sinai

Joohi Jimenez-Shahed, MD, is an Associate Professor of Neurology and Medical Director, of Movements Disorders Neuromodulation and Brain Circuit Therapeutics at Mount Sinai. In addition to being a researcher, she is the director of the Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) Program and a co-chair of the Functional Neurosurgical Working Group of the Parkinson Study Group, where is she also a member of the Executive Committee and Chair of the Mentoring Committee. She also serves on the Science Advisory Board of the Davis Phinney Foundation and the Medical Advisory Board of the Tourette Association of America (TAA). Dr. Jimenez-Shahed received the Roy H. Cullen Quality of Life Award from the Houston Area Parkinson Society as well as the Rising Star Clinician Award from BCM. She also was honored by the Texas chapter of the TAA. She completed undergraduate training at Washington University in St. Louis, medical school at BCM, and a neurology residency at Duke University, then a fellowship in movement disorders at the Parkinson's Disease Center and Movement Disorders Clinic at BCM.

Karen Williams, Senior Research Coordinator

Northwestern Medical Center

Karen Williams is a Senior Research Project Manager at Northwestern. She has greater than 25 years of experience in clinical research, of which 16 were dedicated to Parkinson’s research. She has served on the Parkinson’s Study Group Executive Committee and on a number of community outreach committees. As a native Chicagoan, she is passionate about increasing awareness of PD research in Chicago. 

Ruth Schneider, MD

University of Rochester

Dr. Schneider graduated from Brown University in 2006 and received her MD from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry in 2010. She completed her neurology residency in 2014 and a movement disorders fellowship in 2015, both at the University of Rochester. She joined the faculty in 2015 and specializes in the care of patients with movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and essential tremor. She is the Director of our Huntington’s Disease Society of America Center of Excellence.

TOPAZ (Trial of Parkinson’s And Zoledronic Acid)

Friday, June 3rd, 7:00am – 8:00am

TOPAZ is an NIH-funded randomized placebo controlled clinical trial to investigate whether the bisphosphonate zoledronic acid can reduce fractures and decrease risk of dying in people with PD or parkinsonism. Fractures are a major reason for disability and loss of independence in people with Parkinson’s disease, but few are treated. TOPAZ is a completely home-based study. Enrollment is online. Participants will receive treatment in their homes, and follow-up will be conducted remotely.

This meeting is open to all. We hope you can join us! We will provide updates on study progress, share recruitment methods, discuss challenges, and share tips for success when recruiting for TOPAZ.

PSG 34th Annual Symposium: Parkinson’s Disease & the Environment

Friday, June 3rd, 8:00am – 2:00pm

On behalf of the PSG, we welcome you to the 34th annual symposium in Phoenix, AZ. The theme of the meeting is the interplay between the environment and Parkinson’s disease, with keynote lectures on gene-environment interactions, the gut microbiome, infectious factors in disease etiology, and environmental interventions in management.  Featured speakers include, Beate Ritz, MD, PhD, Haydeh Payami, PhD, Richard Smeyne, PhD,  and John Duda, MD. The program will also feature poster and platform presentations on current research in Parkinson’s disease. 

CME ACCREDITATION STATEMENT

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of PeerPoint Medical Education Institute and the Parkinson Study Group. PeerPoint Medical Education Institute is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. 

AMA CREDIT DESIGNATION

PeerPoint Medical Education Institute designates the live format for this educational activity for a maximum of 3.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Read the CME disclosure statement.

Symposium Keynote Speakers

John Duda, MD

University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Duda is a movement disorders neurologist at the University of Pennsylvania and the Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center in Philadelphia where he is the Director of the Parkinson’s Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center (PADRECC) and the Co-Director of the Center for Neurotrauma, Neurodegeneration and Restoration. His research interests include understanding the pathophysiology of PD, bioengineered strategies for the treatment of PD, and the use of olfaction as a biomarker inPD. He has a long-standing interest in nutrition and Parkinson’s disease, and runs the Brain Wellness Clinic in the PADRECC, where Veterans learn about how lifestyle can affect PD symptoms.

Richard Krolewski, MD, PhD

Harvard Medical School

Richard Krolewski, MD, PhD, joined the staff at BWH after training in the Harvard Neurology Residency and Movement Disorders fellowship programs at BWH and MGH. His clinical and research interests involve gene-environment interactions in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. He has an active basic science program in the laboratory of Professor Lee Rubin at Harvard University that uses dopaminergic neurons from patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to model the effects of environmental toxicants and other biologically active compounds on the development of Parkinson’s disease. Dr. Krolewski is an Instructor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School.

Lan Luo, MD, MS

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School

Dr Lan Luo is a junior faculty within the Movement Disorders division at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School and is also the Co-Director of the DBS Program.  Prior to BIDMC, she completed fellowship and epidemiology training at Columbia University Medical Center and finished medical school and adult neurology residency at Baylor College of Medicine. In 2020, she was awarded a Parkinson Study Group Mentored Clinical Research Award for her research focused on localizing a brain circuit for Parkinsonian gait dysfunction using structural and functional connectivity. This work was selected for oral presentations at AAN and MDS conferences last year.

Haydeh Payami, Ph.D.

The University of Alabama at Birmingham

Haydeh Payami received a PhD in Genetics from the University of California at Berkeley. She has served as Professor of Genetics and Neurology at Oregon Health & Science University, Senior Research Scientist and Director of Genomics Institute at New York State Department of Health Wadsworth Center, and is currently Professor and Endowed Chair in Parkinson’s research in the Departments of Neurology and Genetics at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Dr. Payami is the founder and the lead investigator of the NeuroGenetics Research Consortium. Payami lab studies the interaction of the human genome, the gut microbiome and environmental factors in the etiology, progression and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

Beate Ritz, MD, Ph.D.

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

Dr. Ritz is a Professor of Epidemiology at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health with co-appointments in Environmental Health Sciences and Neurology at the UCLA, SOM; and a member of the Center for Occupational and Environmental Health. For a decade, she co-directed the NIEHS-funded Center for Gene-Environment (GxE) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) at UCLA targeting occupational and environmental toxins such as pesticides in relation to Parkinson’s disease. She collaborates with neuroscientists, human geneticists, and clinicians at UCLA. She has been the PI of two large population-based case control studies of PD in Denmark (PASIDA study with 3600 participants) and in California’s central valley the long-running Parkinson, Environment and Genes (PEG) study that started collecting data from 1,870 PD patients and controls in the year 2000.  For PEG, Dr. Ritz’ team has also collected and stored bio-samples (blood, serum, plasma, saliva, urine, fecal matter) and recorded longitudinal motor and non-motor progression in the PD patients over a decade of follow-up. Her lab has collected genetic, genomics, epigenetic, metabolomics, questionnaire and clinical phenotyping and progression data for PEG study participants enrolled between 2001 and 2018 with progressive updates of patients’ status; most recently her team started collecting fecal samples form study participants. She served on multiple IOM committees evaluating ‘Gulf War Illnesses’, ‘Health Effects of Veterans from Herbicide Exposures in Vietnam’, and ‘Incorporating 21st Century Science into Risk-Based Evaluations’, the U.S. EPA CASAC panel (Carbon Monoxide NAAQS); and currently is a member of the Scientific Review Panel on Toxic Air Contaminants for the state of California.  In 2008, she received a research Award from the American Parkinson’s Disease Association and she made the Clarivate list of most highly-cited authors list in 2018. In 2018, she was elected President of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology.

Richard Smeyne, Ph.D.

Thomas Jefferson University

Richard Smeyne received his doctorate in anatomy from Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia and conducted his post-doctoral training in molecular neurobiology at the Roche Institute of Molecular Biology. He joined the St. Jude staff in 1996. Dr. Smeyne's research focuses on the cell biology of Parkinson's disease, with an interest in the interactions between the immune system and the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). He has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, The Michael J. Fox Foundation, The National Parkinson Foundation and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Dr. Smeyne is a member of the National Parkinson Foundation Scientific Advisory Board and has published in high-impact journals including Nature, Science, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Cell and the Journal of Neuroscience. Currently, he serves as an editor for PloS One.

Tanya Simuni, Professor, MD

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Prof. Simuni joined the faculty of the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in 2000 to build a multidisciplinary movement disorders center that is recognized by the Parkinson’s Foundation, Huntington Disease Society of America and Wilson’s Foundation as a Center of Excellence and serves as a training model in the region. She is the lead investigator for a number of clinical trials on experimental pharmacology, non-motor manifestations and pharmacological management of Parkinson’s disease (PD). She serves on a number of committees for PD national clinical trials, the Parkinson Study Group (PSG) and the Parkinson’s Foundation. She is the site PI for the largest PD biomarker initiative (PPMI study) and for the Network for Excellence in Neuroscience Clinical Trials (NEXT). Prof. Simuni is an active member of the American Academy of Neurology, American Neurological Association, the Movement Disorders Society as well as the PSG.

PAIR Advocacy Workshop:
Strategies for Reaching Communities Not Traditionally Engaged in Research

Presented in partnership with the Parkinson’s Foundation

Friday, June 3rd, 3:00pm – 4:30pm

Including representative populations of people with Parkinson’s in research is critical to ensuring study findings apply to broader communities and advancing health equity. Representative people with Parkinson’s need to be included, not only as study participants, but early and often in research design and implementation. This session will focus on real-world examples of projects focused on expanding diversity, equity and inclusion in research.

Researchers, people with Parkinson’s and the Foundation will share tips, resources, best practices and pilot projects that will provide key take-aways for getting started in creating inclusive, equitable and patient-engaged research studies.

PAIR Advocacy Featured Speakers

Chantale Branson, MD

Morehouse School of Medicine

Dr. Branson is currently an Assistant Professor of Neurology, Course Director at Morehouse School of Medicine, and adjunct Assistant Professor of Neurology at Boston University Medical Center. Dr. Branson completed her neurology residence, movement disorders, and sleep medicine fellowship at Boston University Medical Center. Dr. Branson is the first movement disorders specialist at Morehouse School of Medicine. Under her stewardship, Morehouse became the first historically black institution to join the Parkinson's Study Group (PSG) consortium. She has also developed a movement disorder clinic at Grady Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia. 

Her research interests include eradicating racial disparities among people with Parkinson's disease. This includes exploring physician and environmental factors that may impact the inequity among people with Parkinson's disease. Dr. Branson is an active member of the Movement Disorders Society. 

Danielle Larson, MD

Northwestern Medical Center

Danielle Larson completed medical school at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston, MA prior to completing Neurology residency training at Northwestern. She is a Neurology-Board Certified Movement Disorders specialist, after completing Movement Disorders fellowship at Northwestern's Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center. In addition to her clinical work, she conducts Parkinson's disease research through involvement as an investigator on multicenter clinic trials, in community-engaged research for under-served PD populations, and on telemedicine utilization for Movement Disorders. She is passionate about increasing underrepresented group (URG) awareness of PD and their access to PD treatments and research opportunities, in line with a larger goal of improving PD research diversity, equity and inclusivity. She co-founded the Chicago Movement Coalition in 2019, a community-academic partnership which hosts community educational events for PD in URG-predominant Chicago communities. 

Adolfo Ramirez-Zamora, MD

University of Florida

Adolfo Ramirez-Zamora is currently an Associate Professor of Neurology and director of clinical trials at the University of Florida, Center for Movement Disorders and Neuro restoration, which is part of the Center for Translational Research in Neurodegenerative Diseases and the McKnight Brain Institute. Dr. Ramirez practiced neurology over the past 5 years at the Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Center at Albany Medical Center where he served as an Associated Professor of Neurology and the Philly E. Dake Chair in Movement Disorders. Dr. Ramirez completed a surgical internship at Mercy hospital of Philadelphia along with a medicine internship At Bassett Healthcare Hospital in Cooperstown, NY. He then went on to complete his neurology residency at Loyola University Chicago followed by fellowship training in movement disorders at the University of California San Francisco. Dr. Ramirez’s unique areas of expertise encompass management of the entire spectrum of movement disorders, cerebellar ataxias and the use of botulinum toxin injections and Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of movement disorders.

His research interests include investigating new DBS surgical and programming techniques in movement disorders, understanding the neurophysiological brain changes observed in these conditions and the use of neuromodulation for the treatment of uncommon neurological diseases. Dr. Ramirez has a strong interest and experience in conducting clinical trials in Neurology. His clinical focus comprises evaluation of experimental therapeutics in neurology with interested in developing newer treatments in movement disorders.  He serves as a member of the Diversity leadership program and Science Committee at the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and he is an active member of the Ataxia foundation, Movement Disorders Society, Parkinson Study Group, and Huntington Study Group.

Karlin Schroeder, MA

Parkinson’s Foundation

Karlin Schroeder is the Associate Vice President of Community Engagement at the Parkinson’s Foundation, where she leads the Research Advocacy program. Through this program, Karlin creates and directs projects to incorporate patient expertise into research design and implementation with industry, academic centers and government. Her special interests include defining metrics sets and improving diversity and inclusion in patient engagement in Parkinson’s disease research. She is a steering committee member for the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative and a strategic advisory committee member for Patient Focused Medicines Development. Karlin’s professional history focused on work with underserved populations in long term care, women’s health and international health. Karlin has a B.S. in psychobiology and psychology and an M.A in health advocacy.

PSG Coordinators PD Workshop: The Future of Clinical Research

Saturday, June 4th, 9:00am – 12:00pm

The PSG’s goal for this workshop is to focus on the mentorship/training of coordinators who are committed to clinical research in the Parkinson arena. While there are several trainings and resources that a coordinator can utilize, there is no substitute for an in-person training, focusing on peer mentorship. Institutional regulations can vary greatly depending on the coordinators’ location and each coordinator has their own unique set of strengths. This program will help them identify gaps/challenges at their institutions and reeducate and bring awareness of resources/tools that are available to them. Featured talks will cover telehealth, regulatory controls, and the management of clinical trials.

*All participants must have filled out the coordinator survey along with their registration prior to attending this meeting.

Workshop Facilitators

Grace S. Bwala, MBBS, MPH

Massachusetts General Hospital

Grace Bwala is a foreign trained primary care physician with over 17 years of service to patients in her home country, Nigeria that do not have access to healthcare resources. She joined the Movement Disorders team at MGH in 2007, where she currently serves as the senior research coordinator spearheading a vast number of clinical research studies in the movement disorders unit, neurology. Grace serves as the clinical coordinator member of the PSG executive committee, also serving as the coordinator for the Parkinson’s Foundation Center of Excellence dedicating time to serve patients with Parkinson’s Disease and their families. Overall, Grace’s diverse interactions with patients and families of all age groups over the years and her vast knowledge have taught her the importance of humility, sacrifice, hard work and creativity.

Becky Gravenstede, BA

Center for Health + Technology

As a Senior Project Manager and Regulatory Document Specialist at the Center for Health + Technology (CHeT), Becky has been involved in and responsible for the management and health of the Trial Master Files (TMF) for many multi-site studies in the field of therapeutic clinical research. Working closely with site staff, monitors, Sponsors, and study team members, Becky serves as a Subject Matter Expert (SME) for the regulatory aspects of a study. Within CHeT, Becky also serves as a leading member of the Regulatory Management Group, and serves as an SME for electronic TMF (eTMF) systems.

Raymond James, Clinical Research Nurse

Boston University

Raymond James is a Clinical Research Nurse in the Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Center at Boston University. He has been a member of the Parkinson Study Group since 2009 and has coordinated a wide variety of clinical trials in Parkinson’s as a clinical research nurse over the last 12 years. His clinical trial experience has included biomarker discovery, surgical studies, new and repurposed medicines, antibody infusions, and genetics. Raymond also has an interest in helping other coordinators to navigate the complexities of managing clinical trials and mentoring other coordinators.

Melissa Kostrzebski, MS, MBA

Clinical Trials Coordination Center

As the Associate Director of the Clinical Trials Coordination Center (CTCC) Melissa helps lead the operational (project and data management) and administrative (contracts, budgets) conduct of our organization. As a Senior Project Manager for the CTCC, Melissa has been involved in and responsible for the management of many multi-site studies for both device and drug trials.

Ruth Schneider, MD

University of Rochester

Dr. Schneider graduated from Brown University in 2006 and received her MD from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry in 2010. She completed her neurology residency in 2014 and a movement disorders fellowship in 2015, both at the University of Rochester. She joined the faculty in 2015 and specializes in the care of patients with movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and essential tremor. She is the Director of our Huntington’s Disease Society of America Center of Excellence.

Michael Schwarzschild, MD, PhD

Massachusetts General Hospital

Michael A. Schwarzschild, MD, PhD, is a neurologist at Massachusetts General Hospital and Julieanne Dorn Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Schwarzschild’s research investigates genetic and environmental factors linked to Parkinson’s disease and translates insights gained from laboratory models to clinical trials. His group discovered neuroprotective properties of adenosine A2A receptor blockers including caffeine in mouse models of Parkinson’s. His leadership of international academic-industry conferences on brain A2A receptors helped foster further development of A2A blockers, one of which received FDA approval in 2019 to treat Parkinson’s. Through cross-disciplinary collaboration, his team demonstrated that the antioxidant urate can serve as a predictor of Parkinson’s progression as well as risk, and that it confers protection in lab models. Based on these findings they pursued urate-elevating drug therapy strategy culminating in a major Phase III trial, which unfortunately found no evidence of disease modification in early Parkinson’s.

Since 2012 he has co-led the Parkinson Study Group (PSG), a network of North American Parkinson’s trialists dedicated to improving therapy for people with Parkinson’s.

Karen Williams, Senior Research Coordinator

Northwestern Medical Center

Karen Williams is a Senior Research Project Manager at Northwestern. She has greater than 25 years of experience in clinical research, of which 16 were dedicated to Parkinson’s research. She has served on the Parkinson’s Study Group Executive Committee and on a number of community outreach committees. As a native Chicagoan, she is passionate about increasing awareness of PD research in Chicago. 

Renee Wilson, MA, CCRP

Clinical Trials Coordination Center

Renee had lead Project Management at the Clinical Trials Coordination Center (CTCC)/Center for Health + Technology (CHeT), since 2019.  The CTCC manages multi-site clinical trials for neurological and other diseases. Prior to becoming Director of Project Management, Renee was a Project Manager within the CTCC, managing clinical trials focusing on Parkinson’s disease, including drug, biomarker and genetics studies. 

PSG Industry Roundtable

Saturday, June 4th, 12:00pm – 1:30pm

The PSG is hosting its first-ever industry roundtable at this year’s annual meeting. The goal of this program is to bridge the connection between industry and research, and discuss the latest updates in PD drugs and devices. A panel of industry representatives will  introduce their company’s PD pipelines and/or platforms and then respond to  audience in an open forum. The roundtable will be moderated by Ira Shoulson, PSG Co-Founder, and Joohi Jimenez-Shahed, PSG Executive Committee Member and Mentoring Committee Chair. Below you can view the list of industry roundtable representatives.

Industry Roundtable Moderators

Joohi Jimenez Shahed, MD

Mount Sinai

Joohi Jimenez-Shahed, MD, is an Associate Professor of Neurology and Medical Director, of Movements Disorders Neuromodulation and Brain Circuit Therapeutics at Mount Sinai. In addition to being a researcher, she is the director of the Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) Program and a co-chair of the Functional Neurosurgical Working Group of the Parkinson Study Group, where is she also a member of the Executive Committee and Chair of the Mentoring Committee. She also serves on the Science Advisory Board of the Davis Phinney Foundation and the Medical Advisory Board of the Tourette Association of America (TAA). Dr. Jimenez-Shahed received the Roy H. Cullen Quality of Life Award from the Houston Area Parkinson Society as well as the Rising Star Clinician Award from BCM. She also was honored by the Texas chapter of the TAA. She completed undergraduate training at Washington University in St. Louis, medical school at BCM, and a neurology residency at Duke University, then a fellowship in movement disorders at the Parkinson's Disease Center and Movement Disorders Clinic at BCM.

Ira Shoulson, MD

PSG Co-Founder, Founder and Pricipal at Grey Matter Technologies LLC

Ira Shoulson, MD, is founder and principal of Grey Matter Technologies Inc, a company focused on “making patients heard” by capturing and interpreting patient reports using natural language processing and machine learning, applying these technologies to clinical research and care. He is currently Professor of Neurology in the Center for Health + Technology (CHET) at the University of Rochester (Rochester, NY) and adjunct professor of Neurology at Georgetown University (Washington DC). From 2011 to July 2018, Dr. Shoulson was Professor of Neurology, Pharmacology and Human Science and Director of the Program for Regulatory Science and Medicine (PRSM) at Georgetown University, where he was principal investigator of the FDA-Georgetown University Collaborating Center of Excellence in  Regulatory Science and Innovation. From 1990 to 2011, Dr. Shoulson was the Louis C. Lasagna Professor of Experimental Therapeutics and Professor of Neurology, Pharmacology and Medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry in Rochester, New York.

He received his MD degree with Honors (1971) and postdoctoral training in medicine (1971-73) and neurology (1975-77) at the University of Rochester and in experimental therapeutics at the National Institutes of Health (1973-75). Dr. Shoulson founded the Parkinson Study Group in 1985 and the Huntington Study Group in 1994 — international academic consortia devoted to research and development of treatments for Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease and related neurodegenerative and neurogenetic disorders. He was a key investigator in the US-Venezuela Collaborative Huntington Disease Project, which identified the gene responsible for this fatal hereditary disorder. Dr. Shoulson has served as principal investigator of the National Institutes of Health-sponsored trials Deprenyl and Tocopherol Antioxidative Therapy of Parkinsonism (DATATOP) and the Prospective Huntington At Risk Observational Study (PHAROS), and in the leadership of more than 45 other multi-center clinical research studies. He played an instrumental role in the development of 10 new drugs for neurological disorders, including for Parkinson’s disease (selegiline, lazabemide, pramipexole, entacapone, clozapine, rasagiline, rotigitine), Huntington’s disease (tetrabenazine, dutetetrabenazine) and attention deficit disorder (Concerta). He was formerly a health policy fellow in the US Senate, a member of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Council, president of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics (ASENT), and associate editor of JAMA Neurology.

In 2016, he was recipient of the Robert A. Pritzker Prize for Leadership in Parkinson's Research from The Michael J. Fox Foundation. Dr. Shoulson is an elected member of    the National Academy of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and has authored more than 340 scientific reports.

Roundtable Featured Speakers

Chase Babcock, MHA

Director of Operations, Rune Labs

As Director of Operations for Rune Labs, Chase Babcock oversees the rollout and implementation of StrivePD to movement disorder clinicians and people with Parkinson's across North America. Prior to joining Rune Labs, Chase served in senior leadership roles over clinical operations within large health systems, most recently leading Neuroscience & Neurosurgery for Kaiser Permanente Northern California. In addition to his professional work in U.S. based hospitals, Chase also spearheads several global health equity initiative efforts in Haiti. He holds a B.A. in Economics and a Master of Health Administration from The University of South Carolina.

 Rune Labs is a software and data analytics company for precision neurology, built to support care delivery and therapy development. StrivePD, our care delivery tool, enables patients and clinicians to better manage Parkinson’s disease by providing access to curated dashboards that summarize a range of patient data sources. For therapeutics development, biopharma and medical device companies leverage our technology, network of engaged clinicians and patients, and large longitudinal real-world dataset to expedite their development programs.

Andrea Formella, PharmD, BCPP

Senior Director, Publications, Medical Affairs at Supernus Pharmaceuticals

Andrea Formella joined Supernus Pharmaceuticals in with the acquisition of Adamas Pharmaceuticals in 2021.  As Senior Director of Publications in the Department of Medical Affairs, she is responsible for publishing the research underlying Supernus’ marketed and investigational product portfolio.  She enjoys telling the scientific story behind drug products and is passionate about ensuring clinicians are equipped with the information they need to appropriately use and access new medications for their patients. 

Andrea began her career as a clinical instructor and consultant pharmacist at the University of Texas College of Pharmacy and University of Texas Health Science Center, where she specialized in the treatment of patients with psychiatric and neurologic conditions.  While working on industry-sponsored clinical trials for investigational medications in Alzheimer’s disease, she developed an appreciation for the rigor and importance of the drug development process and decided to pursue a career in the pharmaceutical industry. 

Throughout her 20+-year industry career, she has been instrumental in communicating the science behind over 15 products for multiple CNS indications, including 3 product launches in Parkinson’s Disease.  She looks forward to continuing that work with Supernus’ expanded Parkinson’s portfolio.

When not at work, Andrea can be found enjoying time with her husband Ken at their lake house in Tennessee, judging barefoot water-ski competitions, or reveling in the joy of spending time with her 3 new grandchildren.

Aaron Koenig, MD

Vice President in Early Clinical Development at Sage Therapeutics

Aaron Koenig is a Vice President in Early Clinical Development at Sage Therapeutics, where he serves as the Medical Lead for Sage’s neuropsychiatry programs. Prior to joining industry, Aaron was an investigator at the Massachusetts Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at MGH. In additional to training and practicing as a board-certified adult and geriatric psychiatrist, Aaron has been involved in clinical and translational research throughout his career, with a particular focus on the development of treatments for patients with neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, Frontotemporal Dementia, and Huntington’s Disease.

Sage is a biopharmaceutical company committed to developing novel therapies with the potential to transform the lives of people with debilitating disorders of the brain. We are pursuing new pathways with the goal of improving brain health, and our depression, neurology and neuropsychiatry franchise programs aim to change how brain disorders are thought about and treated. Our mission is to pioneer solutions with the potential to deliver life-changing brain health medicines, so every person can thrive.

Grace Liang, MD

VP of Clinical Development at Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc.

Grace Liang, MD is Vice President, Clinical Development at Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. in San Diego, and Health Sciences Clinical Professor at University of California San Diego. She received her medical degree at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and completed her neurology residency and Clinical Research Fellowship in Movement Disorders at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. She was a Movement Disorders Specialist and Director of Clinical Trials at the Parkinson’s Institute, Sunnyvale, California, where she was a principal investigator on numerous clinical trials and has been a co-author on articles and chapters on Parkinson Disease, essential tremor, and other related movement disorders. At Neurocrine, she has been involved in multiple development programs including those leading to FDA approval for valbenazine for the treatment of tardive dyskinesia and opicapone for Parkinson’s disease. She is a member of the American Academy of Neurology, International Parkinson and Movement Disorders Society, and the Parkinson Study Group.

At Neurocrine Biosciences, our purpose is simple: to relieve suffering for people with great needs, but few options. We apply our experience and unique insight into the interconnections between brain and body systems to treat complex conditions. We relentlessly pursue medicines to ease the burden of debilitating diseases and disorders, because you deserve brave science.

While others walk away from neuroscience because of risk and complexity, our team persists, resulting in four FDA-approved therapies for tardive dyskinesia, Parkinson’s disease, endometriosis*, and uterine fibroids*, as well as clinical programs in multiple therapeutic areas.

For three decades, Neurocrine Biosciences has applied its unique insights into neuroscience to advance medicines for neurological, endocrine, and psychiatric disorders. We have specialized in targeting and interrupting disease-causing mechanisms involving the interconnected pathways of the nervous and endocrine systems. Through internal investment and external collaboration, we relentlessly pursue scientific discovery and development that can lead to important therapies for patients who desperately need new, better options.

*in collaboration with AbbVie

Jens Schroeder, MD, PhD

Vice President Clinical Development at BlueRock Therapeutics

Jens is leading the late-stage Clinical Development programs for Parkinson’s Disease at BlueRock Therapeutics -a wholly owned, independent subsidiary of Bayer AG. BlueRock Therapeutics is a leading engineered cell therapy company with a mission to develop regenerative medicines for intractable diseases. BlueRock Therapeutics’ portfolio of cell therapies is focused on neurology, cardiology and immunology with a lead program in Parkinson’s disease, currently studied in a Phase 1 trial.

Jens’ career in the life science industry spans more than 20 years, with a primary focus on the early and late-stage development of biologics, medical devices and combination products in specialty care and rare diseases. He has authored several peer-reviewed publications, given numerous presentations at scientific symposia and is an inventor with an issued patent in the field of facial reconstructive surgery. Jens is a trained Neurosurgeon and Molecular Biologist. He holds a MD from Hamburg University School of Medicine, Germany and a PhD from the Institute for Immunology, Hamburg University, Germany.

Jason Feipel

Senior Director, Product Development, Medtronic Brain Modulation

Jason Feipel is currently the Senior Director of Product Development for the Brain Modulation Business at Medtronic.  Jason has led cross-functional teams in Engineering, Project Management, Data Science and Acquisition Integration while at Medtronic, across Neuromodulation, Cardiac Rhythm, and Cranial and Spinal Technologies.  Prior to joining Brain Modulation, Jason led the Integration of Medtronic’s Acquisition of Mazor Robotics in Caesarea, Israel and served on the product development team for the Reveal LINQ Insertable Cardiac Monitor.

Jason graduated with a Bachelor of Science Degree from the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland and a Masters of Business Administration from the University of Saint Thomas in Saint Paul, Minnesota. Prior to joining Medtronic, he served in the United States Marine Corps as a Signals Intelligence Officer.

With over 25 years of innovation, Medtronic is the global leader in Deep Brain Stimulation Therapy.  There are over 175,000 patients worldwide with Medtronic DBS implants.  In June of 2021 Medtronic received FDA approval for the first and only DBS system designed for sensing using the Sensight DBS system and Percept PC with Brainsense Technology.  The first-of-its-kind SenSight directional lead combines the benefits of directionality with the power of sensing.  Built with proprietary materials, components, and processes, the SenSight directional DBS lead works seamlessly with the Percept PC neurostimulator to enhance detection of local field potentials (LFPs), which are 1 million times smaller than DBS stimulation pulses. 

Medtronic supports research to advance scientific and clinical knowledge related to our products and therapies. Today, clinical evidence has become increasingly more important in helping foster revolutionary change that advances medicine in Parkinson’s Disease.  Research conducted in-office suggests that local field potential or LFP power measurements at select frequencies correlate with symptoms of PD and treatments for PD in certain subgroups of patients. 

Ryan Walsh, MD, PhD

FAAN, Senior Director, Neurology, at Sun Pharma Advanced Research Company (SPARC)

Dr. Walsh graduated cum laude from Georgetown University with a B.S. in Biology and went on to complete medical and doctoral training in the NIH-funded MD/PhD Medical Scientist Training Program at The University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. He then received both post-doctoral training in functional magnetic resonance imaging and residency training in Neurology at The University of Chicago Medical Center, and subsequently pursued fellowship training in Movement Disorders at the Parkinson’s Disease (PD) program at The University of Alabama at Birmingham. Following fellowship, Dr. Walsh joined the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health (LRCBH) as the inaugural Director of the Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Program.

Dr. Walsh’s efforts have been recognized by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) where he was selected for the inaugural AAN Emerging Leaders Program, was a three-term member of the AAN Science Committee in addition to being involved in multiple other programs, and where he has been selected as a Fellow and most recently served as ViceChair of the Industry Relations Subcommittee. In addition, Dr. Walsh was PI for the Barrow Lewy Body Dementia Association Research Center of Excellence and Director of the Barrow Huntington’s Disease Society of America Center of Excellence, prior to joining SPARC in September, 2021. Dr. Walsh directs the Neurology/Neuroscience group at SPARC, including leading a Phase III clinical trial in early PD to determine if inhibition of c-Abl leads to disease modification in PD.

Genetic Counseling & Testing for PD: Pearls for the Research Team

Presented in partnership with the Parkinson’s Foundation

Saturday, June 4th, 1:30pm – 4:30pm

The Genetics Bootcamp is an innovative educational approach combining high-yield lectures by experts in genetics covering topics important to movement disorders experts. The Genetics Bootcamp includes three parts: a pre-course lecture series covering basic genetics concepts, the genetics of Parkinson’s disease, and a different ways to access genetic testing, and in-person, live lecture series on hot topics in Parkinson’s disease genetics, and breakout sessions covering essential topics in genetic counseling for clinicians, researchers, and research staff. The overall purpose is to convey key concepts in Parkinson’s disease genetics and genetic counseling to improve the current practice of neurogenetics at PSG Centers of Excellence. CME will be offered.

In support of improving patient care, Parkinson’s Foundation is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team. 

Method for calculating CE credit
Credit was calculated using average reported seat time from Content Validators.

Credit Designation Statements
Parkinson’s Foundation will award credit for the Parkinson’s Foundation Genetics Counseling & Testing for PD: Pearls for the Research Team

Physicians
The physician satisfactorily met all specified learning objectives. Parkinson’s Foundation verifies that this physician has earned 3.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits by satisfactorily meeting all specified learning objectives for the level 2 classification Parkinson’s Foundation Advanced Team Training 2022 Course, in accordance with the AMA Guidelines for Continuing Medical Education on New Procedures and Skills.

Credit is Awarded for the individual courses as follows: 3.0

Nurses
Parkinson’s Foundation has been authorized by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) to award CNE credit. Parkinson’s Foundation Advanced Team Training 2022 Course is designated for 3.0 CNE credits.  Participants should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation. Contact hours are awarded to participants for those portions of the educational activity devoted to the learning experience and time spent evaluating the activity.

Credit is Awarded for the individual courses as follows: 3.0

Physician Assistants

Parkinson’s Foundation has been authorized by the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) to award AAPA Category 1 CME Credit for activities planned in accordance with AAPA CME Criteria. The Parkinson’s Foundation Advanced Team Training 2022 Course activity is designated for 3.0 AAPA Category 1 CME credits. PAs should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation. 

Credit is Awarded for the individual courses as follows: 3.0

Genetics Keynote Speakers

Jamie Fong, MS, CGC

Baylor College of Medicine

Jamie C. Fong is an Assistant Professor and Certified Genetic Counselor at Baylor College of Medicine. She is a per diem Licensed and Certified Genetic Counselor at UC-San Francisco. She provides genetic counseling to people with or at risk for neurodegenerative disease, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and related dementias and movement disorders. She conducts clinical research about individuals’ perspectives of precision medicine for neurodegenerative disease. She serves as the Site Genetic Counselor for the PD Generation study at Baylor College of Medicine. She received her Master’s degree in Genetic Counseling from Sarah Lawrence College, and her Bachelor’s degree in Molecular and Cell Biology from UC-Berkeley. She is a diplomate of the American Board of Genetic Counseling.

Martha Nance, MD

Health Partners, Park Nicollet

Martha Nance is a board-certified neurologist and clinical geneticist with special interest in movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias, as well as other neurogenetic disorders. She has served as the medical director of the Struthers Parkinson’s Center since 2000. In addition to the care of patients and families with neurologic diseases, she is also involved in clinical research to develop better treatments for Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease. Martha is interested in education for both patients and medical professionals. She currently serves as a clinical professor of neurology at the University of Minnesota.

Rachel Paul, MS, CGC

University of Pennsylvania

Rachel A. Paul is a certified genetic counselor at the University of Pennsylvania’s adult neurogenetics program, where she specializes in genetic counseling for movement disorders and other adult-onset neurologic disease. She provides genetic counseling for studies that disclose research genetic test results for Parkinson’s disease, and is also involved in broader research related to genetic testing and genetic counseling across adult-onset neurologic disease. She graduated from the Arcadia University (now University of Pennsylvania) genetic counseling program and is board-certified by the American Board of Genetic Counseling.

Thomas Tropea, DO

Penn Medicine

Thomas Tropea is an Assistant Professor in Neurology at the University of Pennsylvania, and specializes in Parkinson’s disease. His research focuses on understanding common risks among different neurodegenerative diseases and optimizing disclosure of genetic results.

Wendy Uhlman, MS, CGC

University of Michigan

Wendy Uhlmann, MS, CGC is a Clinical Professor in the Departments of Internal Medicine and Human Genetics and Senior Genetic Counselor/Clinic Coordinator of the Medical Genetics Clinic (Adults) at the University of Michigan. She has a long-standing interest in predictive genetic testing, including the ethical issues raised by testing, and has provided genetic counseling and results disclosure to patients at-risk for Huntington disease, Alzheimer’s disease, ALS and other neurological and adult-onset genetic conditions. She served as a Co-Investigator and Study Clinician for the NIH-funded REVEAL (Risk Evaluation and Education for Alzheimer’s Disease) Study and is a Co-Investigator for the Estudio IDEAL Study which is applying the REVEAL Study approach to a Latino community-based population in Northern Manhattan. Wendy Uhlmann is regarded as a leader in the field of genetic counseling – Past President of the National Society of Genetic Counselors, past Board member of the Genetic Alliance and currently is on the Board of Directors of the American Society of Human Genetics and the Editorial Board of the Journal of Genetic Counseling. She received her Bachelor’s Degree in Biology from Oberlin College and Master’s Degree in Human Genetics, specialization in Genetic Counseling, from the University of Michigan.

Jennifer Verbrugge, MS, GC

Indiana University School of Medicine

Jennifer is agenetic counselor in the hereditary genomics division at the Indiana University School of Medicine, where she works on national Parkinson’s disease research projects, including the PD GENEration study. Jennifer provides remote genetic test disclosure and genetic counseling to participants with or at risk for Parkinson’s disease. She has research interest in projects that explore the impact of genetic test disclosure and genetic counseling on study participants.

PSG 32n Annual Meeting & 24th Annual Symposium

June 2nd – June 5th, 2022

The Sheraton Grand Wild Horse Pass, Phoenix, AZ

*featured program

Thursday, June 2

Time Event
1:00pm – 2:00pm Junior Investigator Luncheon
Invitation Only – Room: Horse
1:00pm – 2:00pm HBI-002 Lunch & Meet and Greet
Invitation Only – Room: Quail
2:00pm – 5:00pm HBI-002 Advisory Board Meeting
Invitation Only – Room: Quail
2:00pm – 6:00pm * PSG Junior Investigator Workshop
Invitation Only – Room: Deer/Scorpion
5:00pm – 6:00pm WATCH-PD Steering Committee
Invitation Only – Room: Ant
5:45pm – 8:00pm PSG Executive Committee Meeting/Dinner
Invitation Only – Room: Bird/Road Runner
5:45pm – 7:00pm Dinner (Mentoring Committee, Junior Investigators, Symposium Committee & Speakers)
Invitation Only – Room: Horse
8:00pm – 9:00pm TOPAZ Steering Committee
Invitation Only – Room: Ant

Friday, June 3

Time Event
7:00am – 8:30am Breakfast (hot & cold)
Open to all – Room: Mesquite Terrace/Kave Ballroom
7:00am – 7:55am * TOPAZ
Open to all – Room: Deer/Scorpion
*Breakfast can be brought into the TOPAZ meeting
8:00am – 2:00pm * PSG 34th Annual Symposium: Parkinson’s Disease & the Environment
Open to all – Room: A’kimel O’otham Ballroom
9:40am – 10:00am Break (coffee/tea, soft drinks & snacks)
Open to all – Room: Foyer
12:00pm – 1:00pm ORCHESTRA Steering Committee Meeting
Invitation only – Room: Quail
*Lunch can be brought into the ORCHESTRA SC Meeting
12:00pm – 12:55pm Lunch
Open to all – Room: Mesquite Terrace/Kave Ballroom
1:30pm – 3:30pm WATCH-PD
Invitation Only – Room: Deer/Scorpion
2:15pm – 3:30pm EARSTIM-PD
Invitation Only – Room: Ant
2:30pm – 3:30pm PSG Mentoring Committee Meeting
Invitation Only – Room: Quail
3:00 – 4:30pm * PAIR Advocacy Workshop: Strategies for Reaching Communities Not Traditionally Engaged in Research
Open to all – Room: A’kimel O’otham Ballroom
3:00pm – 4:00pm Break (coffee, tea, & soft drinks)
Open to all – Room: Foyer
3:30pm – 5:00pm SURE-PD Data-Mining Meeting (Day 1 of 2)
Invitation Only – Room: Bird/Roadrunner
4:00pm – 5:00pm PSG Networking Reception
Invitation Only – Room: Horse
5:00pm – 7:00pm PSG Reception (Beer, Wine, & Hot Hors D'oeuvres)
Open to all – Room: Akimel Lawn
6:30pm – 8:30pm AT-HOME PD Steering Committee
Invitation Only – Room: Quail
7:30pm – 9:00pm Genetics/Environmental Risk Working Group
Invitation Only – Room: Ant

Saturday, June 4

Time Event
7:00am – 9:00am Breakfast (continental)
Open to all – Room: Mesquite Terrace/Kave Ballroom
7:00am – 9:00am ORCHESTRA Study Meeting
Invitation only – Room: A’kimel Ballroom #2
*Breakfast can be brought into the ORCHESTRA study meeting
7:00am – 8:30am Cognitive/Psychiatric (Behavior) Working Group
Invitation Only – Room: Bird/Roadrunner
*Breakfast can be brought into the working group meeting
7:00am – 8:30pm Motor Features Working Group
Invitation Only – Room: Deer/Scorpion
*Breakfast can be brought into the working group meeting
8:30am – 10:00am Other Non-Motor Working Group
Invitation Only – Room: Quail
9:00am – 12:00pm * PSG Coordinators Workshop: The Future of Clinical Research
Open to Coordinators Only – Must be registered – Room: A’kimel O’otham Ballroom #1
Breakout Room: Bird/Road Runner
10:15am – 11:00am Break (coffee/tea, soft drinks & snacks)
Open to all – Room: Foyer
11:45am – 1:00pm Lunch (buffet)
Open to all – Room: Mesquite Terrace
12:00pm – 1:30pm * PSG Industry Roundtable
Open to all – Room: A’kimel O’otham Ballroom #2
*Food can be brought into the Industry Roundtable
1:30pm – 4:30pm * Genetic Counseling & Testing for PD: Pearls for the Research Team
Open to all – Room: A’kimel O’otham Ballroom
Breakout Group 1 - Room: Deer/Scorpion
Breakout Group 2 – Room: Bird/Roadrunner
Coordinator Breakout – A’kimel O’otham Ballroom
2:00pm – 4:00pm Headshot Photobooth – Compliments of Supernus
Open to all – Room: Foyer
3:00pm – 4:00pm Break (coffee/tea soft drinks & snacks)
Open to all – Room: Foyer
4:45pm – 6:15pm PSG General Session
Open to all – Room: A’kimel O’otham Ballroom #3 & #4
6:15pm – 6:30pm PSG Group Photo
PSG Members ONLY – Room: Hemapik Lawn
6:45pm – 8:00pm Coordinator’s Dinner
Coordinators only – Room: Coyote/Buzzard Eagle Patio
6:45pm – 8:30pm Investigator’s Dinner
Open to all – Room: Kave 1 & 2

Sunday, June 5

Time Event
7:00am – 9:00am Breakfast (continental)
Open to all – Room: Kave 1 & 2
7:00am – 8:30am Functional Neurosurgical Working Group
Invitation Only – Room: Kave 3
*Breakfast can be brought into the working group meeting
8:30am – 9:30am RAD-PD
Invitation Only – Room: Bird/Roadrunner
9:30am – 11:00am SURE-PD3 Data-Mining (Day 2 of 2)
Invitation Only – Room: Deer/Scorpion
9:30am – 1:00pm SPARX3
Invitation Only – Room: Kave 3
11:00am – 12:00pm AID-P
Invitation Only – Room: Bird/Roadrunner